Archive for Food News

What the Well Dressed Salad Wears

Salad is often the first thing people think of when they’re trying to cut down on calories and eat healthy. It’s a good instinct – salads made with leafy greens and other veggies are packed with important nutrients and health protection. The problem is when those salads get dressed. To put it bluntly – they get fat.

There are plenty of ways to get lots of flavor in a dressing without a lot of fat. Olive oil is fine for a base when used in moderate amounts. Other bases, though, like a fruit or vegetable juice, can replace the oil in many vinaigrette recipes. Even creamy dressings don’t have to be heavy and fat-laden. They can be lightened up with non- or low-fat buttermilk, yogurt, or sour cream.

Wow, now that seems like one of those NBC, “The More You Know” type blurbs.

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The Great Pyramids in Egypt Have Nothing on This Pyramid

I like to live my life in a structured manner… So much so that my psychological makeup is determined by Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, and physiologically I live by the FDA’s mighty Food Pyramid. Now, I am not feeling structured enough to go through it here, but I would recommend that you get yourself a refresher on this important hierarchy of necessary foods and their groupings by checking out this site: http://www.lifespan.org/services/nutrition/articles/usda_pyramid.htm

Next week, the mighty Dietary Sphinx!

-h

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Do you like to top your Twinkies with garlic?

Yeah, the very thought of that is something that can make you swear-off mass-produced, cream-filled pastries for good!

But, there is an interesting article I came across in the Journal of Food Safety having to do with preservatives, and how there may be a natural alternative to them – spices.

Research has found that commercially available, powder-form versions of garlic, turmeric and ginger can act as a deterrent to Salmonella in ground beef.  Now, there is a lot of Science-Speak in the journal entry, but it is good reading and really rather interesting.  I suggest you check it out either on the web at http://ift.confex.com/ift/2005/techprogram/paper_30757.htm or in print.  The article reference can be found at the end of this post.  And, you can always find interesting information about Celebrity Foods and our commitment to food safety by visiting Celebrity Foods Safety.

And don’t worry, your Twinkie is safe, for now… but how DO they get that cream filling in there??

Oh yeah, and you can find that article here:

Journal of Food Safety

Vol. 26 Issue 2 Page 115 May 2006 EFFECT OF SPICES ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM DT

104 IN GROUND BEEF STORED AT 4 AND 8C
MILAGROS UHART, NICOLE MAKS, SADHANA RAVISHANKAR

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New Food Safety Resource

Good afternoon, kids!

There is a new resource out there that you may want to check out if you have an interest in food safety, or if people ever ask you about food safety. After all, we are in the business and we should be able to speak intelligently. I know that I am going to try harder to act educated on the matter, instead of just making things up the way that I always do.

The site you want to go to can be found at Celebrity Foods Safety.

happy reading.

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got camel milk?

From the online news source, Ananova,

Camel’s milk chocolate

Low fat camel’s milk chocolate is due to hit shelves after an Austrian chocolate maker joined forces with an Arabic camel farm.

Vienna-based Chocolatier Hochleitner has developed the sweet treats by using milk from the United Arab Emirates and money from the Abu Dhabi royal family. Company head Johann Georg Hochleitner said: “We have come so far and what was once thought of as a crazy idea has become a huge project, particularly in the Arabic world where there is a potential market of about 200 million people.”

He added: “Powdered camel milk is sent from Abu Dhabi to Austria where we produce the raw chocolate and then send it back for processing to a factory in the middle of the desert.”

According to Hochleitner camel’s milk is a good alternative to cow’s milk because it is lower in fat and sweeter. The chocolate, which is to hit the Arabic market this autumn, is called Al Nassma, after the cool wind that blows in the desert. And the chocolate is expected to be introduced to the EU market after its launch in Abu Dhabi in the autumn.

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Food Trends

Even before I started working for Celebrity Foods, I heard about food trends on the West Coast. It seems that today it’s not just celebrities that are getting a makeover, but food is too. From organic farming to kitchen-specific technology, consumers are being encouraged to do more than just slice and dice. The most popular food trends I found mentioned online are specific growing techniques, eating habits, and specialized cookware and appliances.

Some specific growing technique trends becoming more popular are organic farming and heirloom vegetables. Organic farming is a form of agriculture that does not include synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, or genetically modified organisms. It includes “outdoor grazing for livestock and poultry.” Heirloom vegetables are vegetables that are grown from a specific seed, over and over again, usually by a family of generations and generations of growers.

Since the American Heart Association revised their dietary guidelines, a slew of companies are encouraging healthier eating habits that also have some variety to them. Hyatt Hotels Corporation revised its Cuisine Naturelle menu to include a Vegetarian Pouch with Couscous and a Salmon Spiral with Tabbouleh Salad. Food For Flight, based in the Fairmont Vancouver Airport, which is an airport and hotel in British Columbia, is a food service that offers prepared meals to go for busy travelers or hotel guests. Folks either order through room service or by calling the restaurant and placing a take-out order.

Although the ‘ol stand by can opener is still around a buck, engaged couples are putting specialized cookware and appliances on their gift list. Cast iron fry pans and French ovens from Le Creuset , KichenAid standing mixers, as well as Krups Power Xtreme Premium mixer used to crush ice ever so quietly but with great strength top the list.

Tomato, tomatoe, super tomato – brought to me by an airport or cooked in a pan costing more than my car payment. As long as it keeps me tickin, I don’t care what it’s called and how it’s prepared. How ‘bout you? What do you think?

   

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Mangos & Peppercorns

Every newspaper has a Food section and sometimes the strangest topics are found there, not just Grandma’s recipe for beef stew. Here’s what I found in a couple newspapers this week that I thought you might find interesting.

From Monday’s OC Register :

Now you can get the seed in the middle of annoying fruits, like mangos, out more easily with…..duh…duh…duh….drumroll – the Mango Splitter! A company called OXO just put it out. This nifty gadget is safe to wash in the dishwasher and available for $12 at Crate & Barrel.

From Monday’s LA Times :

There’s a spice that used to be banned in the US that’s back – Sichuan peppercorns. This spice was banned by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture because the tree that the spice is harvested from carries pests so the US was afraid the pests would invade the orchards of the US.

“About two years ago, it was found that heating the peppercorns to 140 degrees made them safe enough to import.” So now, as long as a paper accompanies the peppercorns which states that the peppercorns have gone through this process, the Sichuan peppercorns are free to delight our American senses.

So, what have you found out about your food lately?

 

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